Taja

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Language : en
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The Routledge Dictionary Of Anthropologists

Author by : Gérald Gaillard
Language : en
Publisher by : Psychology Press
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Total Read : 13
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Description : This detailed and comprehensive guide provides biographical information on the most influential and significant figures in world anthropology, from the birth of the discipline in the nineteenth century to the present day. Each of the fifteen chapters focuses on a national tradition or school of thought, outlining its central features and placing the anthropologists within their intellectual contexts. Fully indexed and cross-referenced, The Routledge Dictionary of Anthropologists will prove indispensable for students of anthropology.


Bridging Imaginations

Author by : Dr Amit Sarwal
Language : en
Publisher by : Readworthy Publications
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Total Read : 95
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Description : Migration of the South Asian peoples to Australia has resulted in a continually growing and flourishing diaspora, one of the most prosperous communities, with an ever–increasing role and responsibility in all areas of society. One of the challenges in writing about the South Asian diaspora in Australia is the nature of the beast: the multifarious migration and entry points into Australia range from colonial indentured workers to political asylum seekers to transnational marriages to students and high–end professionals. How did their journeys and experiences generate bridges that have influenced the historical, cultural, social and academic perceptions of the ever–changing continents? It is hoped that this critical anthology will help present a dynamic community in transit, and showcase the achievements of the South Asian diaspora during the last decade, which have not only made a significant impact on Australia’s multiculutural landscape but also furthered South Asian–Australian engagement.


The Melanesian World

Author by : Eric Hirsch
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 22
Total Download : 499
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Description : This wide-ranging volume captures the diverse range of societies and experiences that form what has come to be known as Melanesia. It covers prehistoric, historic and contemporary issues, and includes work by art historians, political scientists, geographers and anthropologists. The chapters range from studies of subsistence, ritual and ceremonial exchange to accounts of state violence, new media and climate change. The ‘Melanesian world’ assembled here raises questions that cut to the heart of debates in the human sciences today, with profound implications for the ways in which scholars across disciplines can describe and understand human difference. This impressive collection of essays represents a valuable resource for scholars and students alike.


The Australian Journal Of Science

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Language : en
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Total Read : 13
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Indigenous Studies And Engaged Anthropology

Author by : Paul Sillitoe
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 64
Total Download : 940
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Description : Advancing the rising field of engaged or participatory anthropology that is emerging at the same time as increased opposition from Indigenous peoples to research, this book offers critical reflections on research approaches to-date. The engaged approach seeks to change the researcher-researched relationship fundamentally, to make methods more appropriate and beneficial to communities by involving them as participants in the entire process from choice of research topic onwards. The aim is not only to change power relationships, but also engage with non-academic audiences. The advancement of such an egalitarian and inclusive approach to research can provoke strong opposition. Some argue that it threatens academic rigour and worry about the undermining of disciplinary authority. Others point to the difficulties of establishing an appropriately non-ethnocentric moral stance and navigating the complex problems communities face. Drawing on the experiences of Indigenous scholars, anthropologists and development professionals acquainted with a range of cultures, this book furthers our understanding of pressing issues such as interpretation, transmission and ownership of Indigenous knowledge, and appropriate ways to represent and communicate it. All the contributors recognise the plurality of knowledge and incorporate perspectives that derive, at least in part, from other ways of being in the world.


Case Studies In Human Ecology

Author by : Daniel G. Bates
Language : en
Publisher by : Springer Science & Business Media
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 495
File Size : 54,7 Mb
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Description : This volume was developed to meet a much noted need for accessible case study material for courses in human ecology, cultural ecology, cultural geography, and other subjects increasingly offered to fulfill renewed student and faculty interest in environmental issues. The case studies, all taken from the journal Human Ecology: An Interdisciplinary Jouma~ represent a broad cross-section of contemporary research. It is tempting but inaccurate to sug gest that these represent the "Best of Human Ecology." They were selected from among many outstanding possibilities because they worked well with the organization of the book which, in turn, reflects the way in which courses in human ecology are often organized. This book provides a useful sample of case studies in the application of the perspective of human ecology to a wide variety of problems in dif ferent regions of the world. University courses in human ecology typically begin with basic concepts pertaining to energy flow, feeding relations, ma terial cycles, population dynamics, and ecosystem properties, and then take up illustrative case studies of human-environmental interactions. These are usually discussed either along the lines of distinctive strategies of food pro curement (such as foraging or pastoralism) or as adaptations to specific habitat types or biomes (such as the circumpolar regions or arid lands).


Handbook Of Forensic Anthropology And Archaeology

Author by : Soren Blau
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 17
Total Download : 728
File Size : 46,6 Mb
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Description : With contributions from 70 experienced practitioners from around the world, this second edition of the authoritative Handbook of Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology provides a solid foundation in both the practical and ethical components of forensic work. The book weaves together the discipline’s historical development; current field methods for analyzing crime, natural disasters, and human atrocities; an array of laboratory techniques; key case studies involving legal, professional, and ethical issues; and ideas about the future of forensic work--all from a global perspective. This fully revised second edition expands the geographic representation of the first edition by including chapters from practitioners in South Africa and Colombia, and adds exciting new chapters on the International Commission on Missing Persons and on forensic work being done to identify victims of the Battle of Fromelles during World War I. The Handbook of Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology provides an updated perspective of the disciplines of forensic archaeology and anthropology.