Multiculturalism And The Canon Of American Culture

Author by : Netherlands American Studies Association
Language : en
Publisher by : Vu University Press Amsterdam
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 365
File Size : 51,7 Mb
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Description : In recent years the unity of American culture has been a major topic of literary and intellectual discussion in the United States. The established reading of the American national identity has come under mounting pressure from ethnic minorities of non-European origin. Leading universities have adjusted the Eurocentric canon of the Western literary and cultural tradition, or are considering the need to do so. As a result, a fierce and polarizing debate is being conducted among American writers, intellectuals and educators. In the nineteen essays gathered in this volume scholars from Europe and North America explore the complex range of tensions between the various subcultures and the cultural mainstream in the United States and Canada, as exemplified in intellectual debate, in politics, in religion, in higher education, and in literature, especially in recent American writing by members of cultural minorities: Native Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans and African Americans.


A Journey To Unlearn And Learn In Multicultural Education

Author by : Hongyu Wang
Language : en
Publisher by : Peter Lang
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 33
Total Download : 315
File Size : 43,6 Mb
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Description : Multicultural teacher education does not work without attending to the inner landscapes of learners. This collection of essays depicts a journey of unlearning deeply cherished assumptions, and gaining new, difficult understandings of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and global issues in teacher education. Foregrounding learners' own voices and highlighting those intimate moments of awakening through a process-oriented and dialogic approach, this book, in its profoundly moving narrative and critically reflective voices, speaks directly to pre-service and in-service teachers and informs teacher educators' multicultural pedagogical theory and practice. Demonstrating the power of multicultural education through the learner's lens, this compelling and inspirational book is a much-needed text for undergraduate and graduate courses in teacher education, multicultural education, curriculum studies, and social foundations of education.


Multicultural Poetics

Author by : Nissa Parmar
Language : en
Publisher by : SUNY Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 48
Total Download : 812
File Size : 45,7 Mb
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Description : Argues that multiculturalism and hybridity are key components of the nation’s poetry and its culture. Multicultural Poetics provides a new perspective on American poetry that will contribute to the evolution of contemporary critical practice. Nissa Parmar combines formalist analysis with cultural studies theory to trace a lineage of hybrid poetry from the American Renaissance to what Marilyn Chin deemed America’s “multicultural renaissance,” the blossoming of multicultural literature in the 1980s and 1990s. This re-visionary literary history begins by analyzing Whitman and Dickinson as postcolonial poets. This critical approach provides an alternative to the factionalism that has characterized twentieth-century American poetic history and continues to inform literary criticism in the twenty-first century. Parmar uses a multiethnic, multigender method that emphasizes the relationship between American poetic form and cultural development. This book provides a new approach by using hybridity as the critical paradigm for a study that groups multiethnic and emergent authors. It thereby combats literary ghettoization while revealing commonalities across American literatures and the cross-fertilization that has informed their development. “Parmar demonstrates her mastery of the immense body of scholarship devoted to the poetic lineage Multicultural Poetics engages. She writes with elegance and tact and displays her ability to simplify several concepts—liminality, the third space, interstitiality—of the most confounding of contemporary theorists.” — Donald E. Pease, author of The New American Exceptionalism


Loose Canons

Author by : Henry Louis Gates
Language : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press on Demand
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 77
Total Download : 602
File Size : 52,7 Mb
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Description : Multiculturalism has been the subject of cover stories in Time and Newsweek and other newspapers and magazines around America. A leading literary and cultural critic, Gates says that the society we have made simply won't survive without the values of tolerance, and cultural tolerance comes to nothing without cultural understanding.


Making Multiculturalism

Author by : Bethany Paige Bryson
Language : en
Publisher by : Stanford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 34
Total Download : 693
File Size : 52,5 Mb
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Description : Bryson deconstructs the "canon wars" and uses English departments to demonstrate that social structure is the cornerstone of culture and the appropriate target for cultural policy.


Transnational American Memories

Author by : Udo J. Hebel
Language : en
Publisher by : Walter de Gruyter
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 44
Total Download : 136
File Size : 45,5 Mb
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Description : The volume extends scholary explorations of U.S. American cultures of memory, commemorative identity construction, and the politics of remembrance into the topical field of transnational and comparative American studies. The interdisciplinary range of issues and materials engaged includes literary texts, personal accounts, and cultural performances from colonial times through the immediate present, the significance of war monuments and ethnic memorials in Europe, Asia, and the U.S., films about 9/11, public sculptures and the fine arts, American world s fairs as international sites of memory. "


Writing Manhood In Black And Yellow

Author by : Daniel Y. Kim
Language : en
Publisher by : Stanford University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 90
Total Download : 401
File Size : 53,6 Mb
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Description : This book is a comparative study of African American and Asian American representations of masculinity and race, focusing primarily on the major works of two influential figures, Ralph Ellison and Frank Chin.


American Literature And The Culture Wars

Author by : Gregory S. Jay
Language : en
Publisher by : Cornell University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 861
File Size : 45,8 Mb
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Description : Gregory S. Jay boldly challenges the future of American literary studies. Why pursue the study and teaching of a distinctly American literature? What is the appropriate purpose and scope of such pursuits? Is the notion of a traditional canon of great books out of date? Where does American literature leave off and Mexican or Caribbean or Canadian or postcolonial literature begin? Are today's campus conflicts fueled more by economics or ideology? Jay addresses these questions and others relating to American literary studies to explain why this once arcane academic discipline found itself so often in the news during the culture wars of the 1990s. While asking some skeptical questions about new directions and practices, Jay argues forcefully in favor of opening the borders of American literary and cultural analysis. He relates the struggle for representation in literary theory to a larger cultural clash over the meaning and justice of representation, then shows how this struggle might expand both the contents and the teaching of American literature. In an account of the vexed legacy of the Declaration of Independence, he provides a historical context for the current quarrels over literature and politics. Prominent among these debates are those over multiculturalism, which Jay takes up in an essay on the impasses of identity politics. In closing, he considers how the field of comparative American cultural studies might be constructed.


Gateway To The Promised Land

Author by : Mario Maffi
Language : en
Publisher by : NYU Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 10
Total Download : 407
File Size : 52,9 Mb
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Description : This essential reference book is must reading for mental health professionals who assess and treat children and adolescents. Comprehensive, detailed, clearly written, and innovative, it presents the approaches of the leading clinicians in their fields.


A Genealogy Of Literary Multiculturalism

Author by : Christopher Douglas
Language : en
Publisher by : Cornell University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
Total Download : 929
File Size : 44,9 Mb
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Description : As an anthropology student studying with Franz Boas, Zora Neale Hurston recorded African American folklore in rural central Florida, studied hoodoo in New Orleans and voodoo in Haiti, talked with the last ex-slave to survive the Middle Passage, and collected music from Jamaica. Her ethnographic work would serve as the basis for her novels and other writings in which she shaped a vision of African American Southern rural folk culture articulated through an antiracist concept of culture championed by Boas: culture as plural, relative, and long-lived. Meanwhile, a very different antiracist model of culture learned from Robert Park's sociology allowed Richard Wright to imagine African American culture in terms of severed traditions, marginal consciousness, and generation gaps. In A Genealogy of Literary Multiculturalism, Christopher Douglas uncovers the largely unacknowledged role played by ideas from sociology and anthropology in nourishing the politics and forms of minority writers from diverse backgrounds. Douglas divides the history of multicultural writing in the United States into three periods. The first, which spans the 1920s and 1930s, features minority writers such as Hurston and D'Arcy McNickle, who were indebted to the work of Boas and his attempts to detach culture from race. The second period, from 1940 to the mid-1960s, was a time of assimilation and integration, as seen in the work of authors such as Richard Wright, Jade Snow Wong, John Okada, and Ralph Ellison, who were influenced by currents in sociological thought. The third period focuses on the writers we associate with contemporary literary multiculturalism, including Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Frank Chin, Ishmael Reed, and Gloria Anzaldúa. Douglas shows that these more recent writers advocated a literary nationalism that was based on a modified Boasian anthropology and that laid the pluralist grounds for our current conception of literary multiculturalism. Ultimately, Douglas's "unified field theory" of multicultural literature brings together divergent African American, Asian American, Mexican American, and Native American literary traditions into one story: of how we moved from thinking about groups as races to thinking about groups as cultures—and then back again.