Joyce Annotated

Author by : Don Gifford
Language : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Description : This substantially revised and expanded edition of Don Gifford's Notes to Joyce: Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man puts the requisite knowledge at the disposal of scholars, students, and general readers. Professor Gifford's labors in gathering these data into a single volume have resulted in an invaluable sourcebook.


Ulysses Annotated

Author by : Don Gifford
Language : en
Publisher by : Univ of California Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 98
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File Size : 55,9 Mb
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Description : "Teaches more than how to read a particular novel; it teaches us more profoundly how to read anything. This, I think, is the book's main virtue. It teaches us readers to transform the brute fact of our world."—Hugh Kenner


James Joyce

Author by : Len Platt
Language : en
Publisher by : Bloomsbury Publishing
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 94
Total Download : 362
File Size : 45,9 Mb
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Description : James Joyce stands at the forefront of modernism - a writer whose work has gained a unique status in modern Western culture.This book offers an introduction to reading and studying Joycean texts and surveys the key contexts - literary, historical, political, philosophical and compositional - which shaped and determined them. By identifying and engaging with Joyce's writing methods and style, the book opens up strategies and approaches for reading his complex texts. It also introduces the critical reception of Joyce and his work, from the early structuralist and 'myth' critics, through deconstruction, to recent developments including historical criticism and genetic criticism.


James Joyce

Author by : Andrew Gibson
Language : en
Publisher by : Reaktion Books
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 33
Total Download : 316
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Description : From Ulysses to Finnegans Wake, James Joyce’s writings rank among the most intimidating works of literature. Unfortunately, many of the books that purport to explain Joyce are equally difficult. The Critical Lives series comes to the rescue with this concise yet deep examination of Joyce’s life and literary accomplishments, an examination that centers on Joyce’s mythical and actual Ireland as the true nucleus of his work. Andrew Gibson argues here that the most important elements in Joyce’s novels are historically material and specific to Ireland—not, as is assumed, broadly modernist. Taking Joyce “local,” Gibson highlights the historical and political traditions within Joyce’s family and upbringing and then makes the case that Ireland must play a primary role in the study of Joyce. The fall of Charles Stewart Parnell, the collapse of political hope after the Irish nationalist upheavals, the early twentieth-century shift by Irish public activists from political to cultural concerns—all are crucial to Joyce’s literary evolution. Even the author’s move to mainland Europe, asserts Gibson, was actually the continuation of a centuries-old Irish legacy of emigration rather than an abandonment of his native land. In the thousands, perhaps millions, of words written about Joyce, Ireland often takes a back seat to his formal experimentalism and the modernist project as a whole. Yet here Gibson challenges this conventional portrait of Joyce, demonstrating that the tightest focus—Joyce as an Irishman—yields the clearest picture.


Ulysses

Author by : James Joyce
Language : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
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Description : ulysses james joycesummary, study guide, character list, themes etc are added as annotations.Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and then published in its entirety in Paris by Sylvia Beach on 2 February 1922, Joyce's 40th birthday. It is considered to be one of the most important works of modernist literature and has been called "a demonstration and summation of the entire movement."According to Declan Kiberd, "Before Joyce, no writer of fiction had so foregrounded the process of thinking".Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904.Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between the poem and the novel, with structural correspondences between the characters and experiences of Leopold Bloom and Odysseus, Molly Bloom and Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus and Telemachus, in addition to events and themes of the early 20th-century context of modernism, Dublin, and Ireland's relationship to Britain. The novel is highly allusive and also imitates the styles of different periods of English literatu


James Joyce S Dubliners

Author by : James Joyce
Language : en
Publisher by : Vintage
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 37
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Description : Perhaps the greatest short story collection in the English language, James Joyce's Dubliners is both a vivid and unflinching portrait of "dear dirty Dublin" at the turn of the twentieth century and a moral history of a nation and a people whose "golden age" has passed. His richly drawn characters-at once intensely Irish and utterly universal-may forever haunt the reader. In mesmerizing writing rich with evocative imagery, Joyce delves into the heart of the city of his birth, capturing the cadences of Dubliners' speech and portraying with remarkable realism their outer and inner lives. This magnificent collection of fifteen stories, including such touchstones as "Araby," "Grace," and "The Dead," and in the definitive text authorized by the Joyce estate-collated from all known proofs, manuscripts, and impressions of Dubliners to reflect the author's wishes-reveals Joyce at his most accessible and most profound. Featuring a new introduction by acclaimed writer Colum McCann and the stunning cover art and sumptuous packaging that are the hallmarks of the Penguin Classics Graphic Deluxe series, this edition of Dubliners is worthy of the centennial of one of the twentieth century's most important books.


Dubliners

Author by : James Joyce
Language : en
Publisher by :
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Total Read : 63
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Description : Dubliners is a collection of fifteen short stories by James Joyce, first published in 1914.They form a naturalistic depiction of Irish middle class life in and around Dublin in the early years of the 20th century.The stories were written when Irish nationalism was at its peak, and a search for a national identity and purpose was raging; at a crossroads of history and culture, Ireland was jolted by various converging ideas and influences. They centre on Joyce's idea of an epiphany: a moment where a character experiences a life-changing self-understanding or illumination, and the idea of paralysis where Joyce felt Irish nationalism stagnated cultural progression, placing Dublin at the heart of this regressive movement. Many of the characters in Dubliners later appear in minor roles in Joyce's novel Ulysses.The initial stories in the collection are narrated by child protagonists, and as the stories continue, they deal with the lives and concerns of progressively older people. This is in line with Joyce's tripartite division of the collection into childhood, adolescence and maturity.


Cosmopolitan Style

Author by : Rebecca L. Walkowitz
Language : en
Publisher by : Columbia University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 32
Total Download : 868
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Description : In this broad-ranging and ambitious intervention in the debates over the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of cosmopolitanism, Rebecca L. Walkowitz argues that modernist literary style has been crucial to new ways of thinking and acting beyond the nation. While she focuses on modernist narrative, Walkowitz suggests that style conceived expansively as attitude, stance, posture, and consciousness helps to explain many other, nonliterary formations of cosmopolitanism in history, anthropology, sociology, transcultural studies, and media studies. Walkowitz shows that James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W. G. Sebald use the salient features of literary modernism in their novels to explore different versions of transnational thought, question moral and political norms, and renovate the meanings of national culture and international attachment. By deploying literary tactics of naturalness, triviality, evasion, mix-up, treason, and vertigo, these six authors promote ideas of democratic individualism on the one hand and collective projects of antifascism or anti-imperialism on the other. Joyce, Conrad, and Woolf made their most significant contribution to this "critical cosmopolitanism" in their reflection on the relationships between narrative and political ideas of progress, aesthetic and social demands for literalism, and sexual and conceptual decorousness. Specifically, Walkowitz considers Joyce's critique of British imperialism and Irish nativism; Conrad's understanding of the classification of foreigners; and Woolf's exploration of how colonizing policies rely on ideas of honor and masculinity. Rushdie, Ishiguro, and Sebald have revived efforts to question the definitions and uses of naturalness, argument, utility, attentiveness, reasonableness, and explicitness, but their novels also address a range of "new ethnicities" in late-twentieth-century Britain and the different internationalisms of contemporary life. They use modernist strategies to articulate dynamic conceptions of local and global affiliation, with Rushdie in particular adding playfulness and confusion to the politics of antiracism. In this unique and engaging study, Walkowitz shows how Joyce, Conrad, and Woolf developed a repertoire of narrative strategies at the beginning of the twentieth century that were transformed by Rushdie, Ishiguro, and Sebald at the end. Her book brings to the forefront the artful idiosyncrasies and political ambiguities of twentieth-century modernist fiction.