The Captivity Of The Oatman Girls Among The Apache And Mohave Indians

Author by : Lorenzo D. and Olive A. Oatman
Language : en
Publisher by : Courier Corporation
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Description : Riveting true-life story of two sisters taken by Indians, their life in captivity, and their brother's search for them.


Captivity Of The Oatman Girls

Author by : Royal B. Stratton
Language : en
Publisher by :
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Captivity Of The Oatman Girls

Author by : Royal Byron Stratton
Language : en
Publisher by :
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Total Read : 44
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Captivity Of The Oatman Girls

Author by : Royal B. Stratton
Language : en
Publisher by : Simon and Schuster
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 9
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File Size : 42,7 Mb
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Description : A dramatic true story of captivity on the American frontier. In 1851, on route to California in a covered wagon, the Oatman family was brutally attacked by Apache Indians. Six family members were murdered on sight, one boy was left for dead, who escaped afterward, and two young girls, Mary Ann and Olive, were taken captive. Mary Ann, the younger of the two girls, died of starvation in 1852. Olive, however, spent five years in captivity before an incredible rescue. In 1856, she was discovered living among the Mohave tribe, and a ransom was offered in exchange for her release. After years of slavery and bearing a prominent blue tattoo traditional to the Mohave people on her face, Olive was restored to her only living family member, Lorenzo Oatman, the brother who survived. This book was originally commissioned by Lorenzo Oatman as a factual record of his sisters’ fates, based on true events. The story is one of tragedy and loss, at times fascinating and also horrifying. This edition includes illustrations and Olive’s own observations about the customs of her captors and the geography of the land. The dramatic yet somber words of Lorenzo and Olive, as recorded by Royal B. Stratton, bring readers into the thrilling immediacy of the Apache attack, Lorenzo’s escape, the tragic moment when Olive watches Mary Ann die, and most importantly into the final, happy rescue as Olive is reunited with her brother. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.


Olive Oatman

Author by : Eric Miller
Language : en
Publisher by :
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Description : Olive Oatman was fourteen years old when her Mormon family was attacked by a Native American tribe in present-day Arizona. Her parents and four siblings were killed, while Olive and a younger sister were captured and later sold to a Mohave tribe. Her sister would later die of hunger, but Olive survived and spent several years among the Mohave people. She was returned to mainstream American society, however, at the age of nineteen when rumors of a white girl living among the Mohave began to circulate. Her re-introduction caused something of a sensation, partly because of the prominent blue face tattoos she received during her time among the Mohave. She would later speak of her time with the Mohave very fondly, and her transition to a very different culture and then back again were no doubt quite complicated. This story was originally published in 1857 under the title "Captivity of the Oatman Girls Being an Interesting Narrative of Life Among the Apache and Mohave Indians" by Royal B. Stratton. It is re-published here in its entirety.


Captivity Of The Oatman Girls Being An Interesting Narrative Of Life Among The Apache And Mohave Indians Etc Twenty Fifth Thousand Scholar S Choice Edition

Author by : R B Stratton
Language : en
Publisher by : Scholar's Choice
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Description : This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.


The Captivity Of The Oatman Girls

Author by : Charles River Editors
Language : en
Publisher by : Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 92
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File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : *Includes pictures *Includes Olive Oatman's quotes *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "I looked around and saw my poor mother, with her youngest child clasped in her arms, and both of them still, as if the work of death had already been completed; a little distance on the opposite side of the wagon, stood little Mary Ann, with her face covered with her hands, sobbing aloud, and a huge looking Indian standing over her; the rest were motionless, save a younger brother and my father, all upon the ground dead or dying. At this sight a thrill of icy coldness passed over me; I thought I had been struck; my thoughts began to reel and became irregular and confused; I fainted and sank to the earth, and for a while, I know not how long, I was insensible." - Olive Oatman On the North American continent, Native American tribes carried out abductions against the new European settlers from the time they first set foot on eastern shores. Some of the women taken in the colonial to early American period went on to become respected figures in their new environments, while others lived out their lives as slaves. Various tribes perceived the historical value of women's social personalities through different prisms, and even those groups living in the same region often exhibited dissimilar behavior toward them. For some of the more aggressive tribal societies, to commit atrocities against women and their children engaged the same mindset as that adopted for male-to-male warfare. What European sensibilities failed to grasp, despite the home continent's own lurid history, was that the numerous indigenous cultures of North America were already in the habit of perpetrating such abductions against each other and had for thousands of years. Whether the enemy was European or domestic, old or young, male or female, the deeply embedded cultural habit was the same. To steal women from an enemy often brought the same adulation from the collective as the stealing of horses, and abduction initiated by even a single individual brought honor to that person and his family. In the American wilderness, instances occurred wherein the abduction of either horses or human beings was considered essential to survival, if not to pride and manhood. Abductees were generally adopted into the tribe through a specific ritual. Some were based on "violent hazing," while for others, entry into the community was a "mere formality." Children and adolescents were, more often than not, the preferred choice for abduction. In the capturing of slaves, both the strength and docility of the individual taken was of utmost importance. However, in the absence of viable wives, the concept of exogamy, an effort to bring new blood into the tribe, was encouraged. Such a rejuvenation of the community was widely accepted as a convention of war. In the history of abductions among the North American continent's tribes, a low rate of escape attempts by captured settlers has been the norm from the beginning. This may be largely due to geographical obstacles, with help being so far away as to discourage hope of success. By the same token, relatively few rescue attempts were made by white kinsman to rescue a family member from an indigenous tribe. With no contact available to them, families of lost members taken from the colonial period through the 19th century usually fell into a long-term state of grief, but resigned themselves to never seeing their loved ones again. The Captivity of the Oatman Girls: The History of the Young Sisters Who Were Abducted by Native Americans in the 1850s examines the history of one of the most famous abduction stories of the Old West, the kidnapping of the young Oatman sisters and their subsequent experiences with the Mojave. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Oatman sisters like never before.


The Oatman Girls

Author by : Royal B. Stratton
Language : en
Publisher by :
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 99
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File Size : 48,7 Mb
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Description : The incredible story of the girl with the face tattoo The story of the Oatman girls, Olive and Mary Ann, is one of the most famous accounts of the abduction of white women by indigenous Indians in the annals of the history of the American western frontier. The Oatman's, led by their patriarch Royce, were a family of nine. Members of the Mormon faith, they had become dissenters of Brigham Young's leadership and allying themselves with James Brewster and his 'Brewsterites' resolved to move to California in 1850. The original substantial wagon-train they had formed for security split as a result of disagreements within the party and the group to which the Oatman's belonged further fragmented until the family were left travelling alone, against all advice, in hostile Indian territory. On the banks of the Gila River (in present day Arizona) the family were attacked by Indians and all were slaughtered with the exception of two girls, aged 13 and 7 years, who were abducted and a brother. Their brother Lorenzo was felled by a club blow, presumed dead by the assailants, and left among the corpses of his mother, father and siblings, but he regained consciousness and eventually found his way to safety. The girl's captors, Tolkepayas or Yavapais, kept the girls in slavery for a period then sold them to Mohave Apaches. The story of the ordeals of the Oatman girls has inspired fiction and works of history alike. Olive Oatman's face, with its distinctive tattoo has all but become a western icon. Written during the 1850s this book became a bestseller of its day. This Leonaur edition is available in in softcover and hardback with dustjacket or collectors.