American Settlement Houses And Progressive Social Reform

Author by : Domenica M. Barbuto
Language : en
Publisher by : Greenwood
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 85
Total Download : 121
File Size : 46,9 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : Contains over 230 alphabetically arranged entries that provide information about the men and women, institutions, and events that characterized the American Settlement Movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, focusing on the main currents of the movement.


Settlement Houses

Author by : Michael Friedman
Language : en
Publisher by : The Rosen Publishing Group
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 82
Total Download : 391
File Size : 40,7 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : Introduces the men, women, events, and institutions that contributed to the settlement movement of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century in the United States.


The American Settlement Movement

Author by :
Language : en
Publisher by : Greenwood
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 34
Total Download : 105
File Size : 40,9 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : Provides access to titles on one of the most influential reform efforts in American history.


Spearheads For Reform

Author by : Allen Freeman Davis
Language : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 45
Total Download : 976
File Size : 47,7 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : Allen Davis looks at the influence of settlement-house workers on the reform movement of the progressive era in Chicago, New York, and Boston. These workers were idealists in the way they approached the future, but they were also realists who knew how to organize and use the American political system to initiate change. They lobbied for a wide range of legislation and conducted statistical surveys that documented the need for reform. After World War I, settlement workers were replaced gradually by social workers who viewed their job as a profession, not a calling, and who did not always share the crusading zeal of their forerunners. Nevertheless, the settlement workers who were active from the 1880s to the 1920s left an important legacy: they steered public opinion and official attitudes toward the recognition that povery was more likely caused by the social environment than by individual weaknesses.


Encyclopedia Of American Women And Religion 2nd Edition 2 Volumes

Author by : June Melby Benowitz
Language : en
Publisher by : ABC-CLIO
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 56
Total Download : 380
File Size : 47,8 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : This two-volume set examines women's contributions to religious and moral development in America, covering individual women, their faith-related organizations, and women's roles and experiences in the broader social and cultural contexts of their times. • Introduces readers to hundreds of women who became leaders within various religious faiths and denominations, including many who founded religious sects and organizations • Provides an understanding of women's developing roles in American religious culture, which continue to the present day • Enables readers to gain an understanding of the broad range of religions, approaches to religion, and attitudes toward religion in the United States • Documents how life's experiences can shape one's spiritual life and future development • Includes a timeline of the issues facing women that marks changing societal attitudes and individual women's accomplishments across history


Encyclopedia Of Women And Religion In North America

Author by : Rosemary Skinner Keller
Language : en
Publisher by : Indiana University Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 69
Total Download : 681
File Size : 42,7 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : A fundamental and well-illustrated reference collection for anyone interested in the role of women in North American religious life.


Reader S Guide To American History

Author by : Peter J. Parish
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 77
Total Download : 278
File Size : 53,9 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : There are so many books on so many aspects of the history of the United States, offering such a wide variety of interpretations, that students, teachers, scholars, and librarians often need help and advice on how to find what they want. The Reader's Guide to American History is designed to meet that need by adopting a new and constructive approach to the appreciation of this rich historiography. Each of the 600 entries on topics in political, social and economic history describes and evaluates some 6 to 12 books on the topic, providing guidance to the reader on everything from broad surveys and interpretive works to specialized monographs. The entries are devoted to events and individuals, as well as broader themes, and are written by a team of well over 200 contributors, all scholars of American history.


Social Work And Social Order

Author by : Ruth Crocker
Language : en
Publisher by : University of Illinois Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 10
Total Download : 883
File Size : 50,6 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : Progressive era settlements actively sought urban reform, but they also functioned as missionaries for the "American Way", which often called for religious conversion of immigrants and frequently was intolerant of cultural pluralism. Ruth Hutchinson Crocker examines the programs, personnel, and philosophy of seven settlements in Indianapolis and Gary, Indiana, creating a vivid picture of operations that strove for social order even as they created new social services. The author reconnects social work history to labor history and to the history of immigrants, blacks, and women. She shows how the settlements' vision of reform for working-class women concentrated on "restoring home life" rather than on women's rights. She also argues that, while individual settlement leaders such as Jane Addams were racial progressives, the settlement movement took shape within a context of deepening racial segregation. Settlements, Crocker says, were part of a wider movement to discipline and modernize a racially and ethnically heterogeneous work force. How they translated their goals into programs for immigrants, blacks, and the native born is woven into a study that will be of interest to students of social history and progressivism, as well as social work.


Reading For Reform

Author by : Laura R. Fisher
Language : en
Publisher by : U of Minnesota Press
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 11
Total Download : 636
File Size : 48,9 Mb
pdf pdf

Description : An unprecedented examination of class-bridging reform and U.S. literary history at the turn of the twentieth century Reading for Reform rewrites the literary history of late nineteenth and early twentieth century America by putting social reform institutions at the center of literary and cultural analysis. Examining the vibrant, often fractious literary cultures that developed as part of the Progressive mandate to uplift the socially disadvantaged, it shows that in these years reformers saw literature as a way to combat the myriad social problems that plagued modern U.S. society. As they developed distinctly literary methods for Americanizing immigrants, uplifting and refining wage-earning women, and educating black students, their institutions gave rise to a new social purpose for literature. Class-bridging reform institutions—the urban settlement house, working girls’ club, and African American college—are rarely addressed in literary history. Yet, Laura R. Fisher argues, they engendered important experiments in the form and social utility of American literature, from minor texts of Yiddish drama and little-known periodical and reform writers to the fiction of Edith Wharton and Nella Larsen. Fisher delves into reform’s vast and largely unexplored institutional archives to show how dynamic sites of modern literary culture developed at the margins of social power. Fisher reveals how reformist approaches to race, class, religion, and gender formation shaped American literature between the 1880s and the 1920s. In doing so, she tells a new story about the fate of literary practice, and the idea of literature’s practical value, during the very years that modernist authors were proclaiming art’s autonomy from concepts of social utility.