War Crimes Tribunals And Transitional Justice

Author by : Madoka Futamura
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Description : Advocates of the ‘Nuremberg legacy’ emphasize the positive impact of the individualization of responsibility and the establishment of an historical record through judicial procedures for ‘war crimes’. This legacy has been cited in the context of the establishment and operation of the UN ad hoc International Criminal Tribunals in the 1990s, as well as for the International Criminal Court. The problem with this legacy, however, is that it is based solely on the experience of West Germany. Furthermore, the effect of the procedure on post-conflict society has not been empirically examined. This book does this by analyzing the Tokyo Trial, the other International Military Tribunal established after the Second World War, and its impact on post-war Japan. Madoka Futamura examines the short- and long-term impact of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (the Tokyo Trial), on post-war Japan, in order to improve the understanding of and strategy for ongoing international war crimes tribunals. War Crimes Tribunals and Transitional Justice will be of much interest to students of war crimes, international law, transitional justice and international relations in general.


War Crimes And Human Rights

Author by : William Schabas
Language : en
Publisher by : Cameron May
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Description : This is a collection of essays and articles on human rights law and international criminal law authored by William Schabas, one of the most prominent contemporary scholars and practitioners. Particular attention is given to such topics as the limitation and abolition of the death penalty, genocide and crimes against humanity, the establishment and operation of the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals, truth and reconciliation commissions, reservations to human rights treaties, and the implementation of international human rights norms in domestic law


Transitional Justice

Author by :
Language : en
Publisher by :
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Transitional Justice In Rwanda

Author by : Gerald Gahima
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
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Total Read : 62
Total Download : 103
File Size : 46,6 Mb
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Description : Transitional Justice in Rwanda: Accountability for Atrocity comprehensively analyzes the full range of the transitional justice processes undertaken for the Rwandan genocide. Drawing on the author’s extensive professional experience as the principal justice policy maker and the leading law enforcement officer in Rwanda from 1996-2003, the book provides an in-depth analysis of the social, political and legal challenges faced by Rwanda in the aftermath of the genocide and the aspirations and legacy of transitional justice. The book explores the role played by the accountability processes not just in pursuing accountability but also in shaping the reconstruction of Rwanda’s institutions of democratic governance and political reconciliation. Central to this exploration will be the examination of whether or not transitional justice in Rwanda has contributed to a foundational rule of law reform process. While recognizing the necessity of pursuing accountability for mass atrocity, the book argues that a maximal approach to accountability for genocide may undermine the promotion of core objectives of transitional justice. Taking on one of the key questions facing practitioners and scholars of transitional justice today, the book suggests that the pursuit of mass accountability, particularly where socio-economic resources and legal capacity is limited, may destabilize the process of rule of law reform, endangering core human rights norms. Moreover, the book suggests that pursuing a strategy of mass accountability may undermine the process of democratic transition, particularly in a context where impunity for crimes committed by the victors of armed conflicts persists. Highlighting the ongoing democratic deficit in Rwanda and resulting political instability in the Great Lakes region, the book argues that the effectiveness of transitional justice ultimately hinges on the nature and success of political transition.


International Trials And Reconciliation

Author by : Janine Natalya Clark
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 86
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File Size : 50,6 Mb
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Description : Transitional justice is a burgeoning field of scholarly inquiry. Yet while the transitional justice literature is replete with claims about the benefits of criminal trials, too often these claims lack an empirical basis and hence remain unproven. While there has been much discussion about whether criminal trials can aid reconciliation, the extent to which they actually do so in practice remains under-explored. This book investigates the relationship between criminal trials and reconciliation, through a particular focus on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Using detailed empirical data – in the form of qualitative interviews and observations from five years of fieldwork – to assess and analyze the ICTY’s impact on reconciliation in Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia and Kosovo, International Trials and Reconciliation: Assessing the Impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia argues that reconciliation is not a realistic aim for a criminal court. They are, Janine Clark argues, only one part of a rich tapestry of justice, which must also include non-retributive transitional justice processes and mechanisms. Challenging many of the common yet untested assumptions about the benefits of criminal trials, this innovative and extremely timely monograph will be invaluable for those with interests in the theory and practice of transitional justice.


Peace With Justice

Author by : Paul R. Williams
Language : en
Publisher by : Rowman & Littlefield
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Total Read : 62
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File Size : 41,9 Mb
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Description : Resolving the Yugoslav conflict was the last great foreign policy challenge of the twentieth century. Never before in history was so much emphasis placed on the need to employ the concept of justice in the peace process or was so much energy devoted to creating and utilizing international justice-based institutions. In this provocative and insightful book, two former State Department lawyers, Paul R. Williams and Michael P. Scharf, undertake to tell the true story, 'warts and all, ' of the role of justice in building peace in the former Yugoslavia. During the Yugoslav conflict, Serb leader Slobodan Milosevic was transformed from a key partner in peace to an indicted war criminal, who now sits in a 10 x 17 foot cell at the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague. But the road from accommodation to accountability in the Balkans was anything but smooth. Based on their personal experience, extensive research, and interviews with key players in the Yugoslav peace-building process, Williams and Scharf provide a gripping account of how and why justice was misapplied and mishandled throughout the peace-builders' efforts to settle the Yugoslav conflict. All too often human rights and peace advocates treat justice as a panacea for conflict and atrocities, while self-proclaimed realists and professional diplomats dismiss justice as an impediment to peace. Williams and Scharf demonstrate that the truth lies in between. Their definitive study provides a novel framework for understanding the utility of justice as well as its practical limits as a diplomatic tool so that it can be more effectively applied in resolving future conflicts around the globe.


United States Law And Policy On Transitional Justice

Author by : Zachary D. Kaufman
Language : en
Publisher by : Oxford University Press
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Description : In United States Law and Policy on Transitional Justice: Principles, Politics, and Pragmatics, Zachary D. Kaufman explores the U.S. government's support for, or opposition to, certain transitional justice institutions. By first presenting an overview of possible responses to atrocities (such as war crimes tribunals) and then analyzing six historical case studies, Kaufman evaluates why and how the United States has pursued particular transitional justice options since World War II. This book challenges the "legalist" paradigm, which postulates that liberal states pursue war crimes tribunals because their decision-makers hold a principled commitment to the rule of law. Kaufman develops an alternative theory--"prudentialism"--which contends that any state (liberal or illiberal) may support bona fide war crimes tribunals. More generally, prudentialism proposes that states pursue transitional justice options, not out of strict adherence to certain principles, but as a result of a case-specific balancing of politics, pragmatics, and normative beliefs. Kaufman tests these two competing theories through the U.S. experience in six contexts: Germany and Japan after World War II, the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103, the 1990-1991 Iraqi offenses against Kuwaitis, the atrocities in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s, and the 1994 Rwandan genocide. Kaufman demonstrates that political and pragmatic factors featured as or more prominently in U.S. transitional justice policy than did U.S. government officials' normative beliefs. Kaufman thus concludes that, at least for the United States, prudentialism is superior to legalism as an explanatory theory in transitional justice policymaking.


An Introduction To Transitional Justice

Author by : Olivera Simic
Language : en
Publisher by : Routledge
Format Available : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Total Read : 10
Total Download : 505
File Size : 42,8 Mb
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Description : An Introduction to Transitional Justice provides the first comprehensive overview of transitional justice judicial and non-judicial measures implemented by societies to redress legacies of massive human rights abuse. Written by some of the leading experts in the field it takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach to the subject, addressing the dominant transitional justice mechanisms as well as key themes and challenges faced by scholars and practitioners. Using a wide historic and geographic range of case studies to illustrate key concepts and debates, and featuring discussion questions and suggestions for further reading, this is an essential introduction to the subject for students.


Understanding The Age Of Transitional Justice

Author by : Nanci Adler
Language : en
Publisher by : Rutgers University Press
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Total Read : 64
Total Download : 300
File Size : 44,7 Mb
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Description : Since the 1980s, an array of legal and non-legal practices—labeled Transitional Justice—has been developed to support post-repressive, post-authoritarian, and post-conflict societies in dealing with their traumatic past. In Understanding the Age of Transitional Justice, the contributors analyze the processes, products, and efficacy of a number of transitional justice mechanisms and look at how genocide, mass political violence, and historical injustices are being institutionally addressed. They invite readers to speculate on what (else) the transcripts produced by these institutions tell us about the past and the present, calling attention to the influence of implicit history conveyed in the narratives that have gained an audience through international criminal tribunals, trials, and truth commissions. Nanci Adler has gathered leading specialists to scrutinize the responses to and effects of violent pasts that provide new perspectives for understanding and applying transitional justice mechanisms in an effort to stop the recycling of old repressions into new ones.


Reassessing The Nuremberg Military Tribunals

Author by : Kim C. Priemel
Language : en
Publisher by : Berghahn Books
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Total Read : 13
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Description : For decades the history of the US Military Tribunals at Nuremberg (NMT) has been eclipsed by the first Nuremberg trial-the International Military Tribunal or IMT. The dominant interpretation-neatly summarized in the ubiquitous formula of "Subsequent Trials"-ignores the unique historical and legal character of the NMT trials, which differed significantly from that of their predecessor. The NMT trials marked a decisive shift both in terms of analysis of the Third Reich and conceptualization of international criminal law. This volume is the first comprehensive examination of the NMT and brings together diverse perspectives from the fields of law, history, and political science, exploring the genesis, impact, and legacy of the twelve Military Tribunals held at Nuremberg between 1946 and 1949.